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Table of Contents

B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

B

Bit depth

Each pixel in an image contains the number of bits required to save/capture information about the image. The higher the depth, the more colors are stored in the image.

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For example: a low bit-depth (1 bit) can only show two colors: black and white. This is because there are only two combinations of numbers in one bit: 0 and 1. A 4-bit color image is capable of showing 16 colors, since there are 16 different combinations of 4 bits:

0000 0001 0010 0011 0100 0101 0110 0111 1000 1001 1010 1011 1100 1101 1110 1111

Also, 8-bit color has the capacity to show a total of 256 colors; 16-bit color shows a total capacity of 65,536 colors; 24-bit color can show up to a total of 16,777,216 colors.

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C

Color Technologies

The technology that an HP Multifunction product (MFP) or All-in-One (AIO) uses to create color output. Laser MFPs use vertical tandem intermediate transfer belt and laser electrostatic technologies, while Inkjet AIOs use ImageREt and ColorSmart technologies created by HP for the best color output. See Printing Technologies

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Colors

In TI DLP (Texas Instruments Digital Light Processing) technology, color is produced by passing light through a color wheel, shining through the color wheel segments as the color wheel spins. 16.8 million colors can be reproduced.

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After light is passed through the color wheel, the light is then deflected through a single TI DLP chip that contains thousands of tiny mirrors. The light combines on the screen to produce a colored image.

The colors found in HP digital projectors have consistent and accurate color because of the inherent reliability of the DLP technology. Additionally, HP has created new color wheel designs, color tables, and algorithms to provide the optimal combination of brightness and color to fit the projection environment and the content being presented.

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Connectivity: Printers and Multifunction Products

The way a printer connects to a PC or to the network. HP's PC connectivity options include parallel, serial, USB, and infrared. HP's Network connectivity options include wired Ethernet and wireless (including Wi-Fi and Bluetooth). To connect a printer to a computer, both devices must support the same connectivity interface.

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A printer's connectivity interface affects the kind of computers and networks with which the printer can connect. HP printers connect to PCs using one or more of the following interfaces:

  • Parallel: Printers that have a parallel interface can simultaneously transfer several different bits of information. Because they communicate in two directions, these printers can tell you when an error occurs during printing.
  • Serial: Printers with a serial interface can only transfer one bit of information at a time. These printers can only transmit information in one direction but are capable of sending data over great distances.
  • USB (Universal Serial Bus): Printers with a USB interface support a data transfer speed of 12 megabits per second. USB is available in both 1.0 and 2.0, and is gradually replacing serial and parallel ports as the standard interface for connectivity to PCs, making printers with USB support a good investment for future extensibility.
  • Infrared: Printers that have an infrared interface allow communication to the computer without using cords or wires. Infrared connections require infrared readers on both the printer and a PC to have an unblocked view of one another to transmit data.

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Connectivity: Digital Photography

The ability to connect a host computer for image download using USB cables. HP cameras are able to connect directly to printers and camera docks. Some systems may also include serial or parallel cables for communications.

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Connectivity: Projectors

The ability to connect a projector to different source devices using device-specific cables.

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HP projectors are capable of connecting to a variety of devices, such as PCs (Desktop, Portable, Handheld, and Tablet), DVDs, and VCRs. The HP xp and vp series products, for instance, have a large number of input connections for connecting multiple devices simultaneously (e.g., PC, monitor, and a VCR for teaching). Moreover, all HP projectors are “smart,” meaning they can adjust brightness, contrast, color depth, and other image properties to create the perfect image, regardless of input device – automatically, and without operator assistance.

HP products are tested using various PCs, DVDs and VCRs, and designed to support the new TV standards: SDTV (480i), EDTV (480p), and HDTV (720p and 1080i).

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Connectivity: Scanners

Connecting a scanner to a host computer using either a serial, parallel, or USB cable for communications.

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Contrast

The difference between the white and black the projector can project; also referred to as the contrast ratio. The ratio is the measure of the projector’s brightest white divided by the projector’s darkest black. A high ratio means a clear and sharp display that can offset the damaging effects of ambient light in a room. For color, the greater the contrast, the greater the depth of color and richness of shadow detail.

Learn more
Because DLPTM projectors absorb light more effectively than LCD projectors, they can provide a higher contrast ratio, resulting in deep black tones and details in video and graphics. HP continues to provide imaging algorithms that enable HP projectors to boast contrast ratios 200% higher than previous generations, and contrast ratios continue to rise. The vp6320, for example, has a category-leading 2500:1 contrast ratio.


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Copy Resolution (color/black)

The maximum resolution, measured in dots per inch (DPI), that an HP Multifunction product (MFP) or All-in-One (AIO) can produce on copied documents. Generally, the higher the DPI, the better the detail and clarity your copied document will have.

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Copy Settings

The copy capabilities that an HP Multifunction product (MFP) or All-in-One (AIO) supports. Common copy features include fit-to-page, reduce/enlarge, resolution, contrast, copy collation, number of copies and paper size. Color MFPs and AIOs may have different copy settings for color and black & white.

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Cost Per Page

The total cost per U.S letter-sized page with 15% color coverage or 5% monochrome coverage including ink, replaceable parts, power, paper, and average service costs. (The cost-per-page information provided for individual printer models is based on the best information available and is not guaranteed accurate by Hewlett-Packard Company. Actual prices may vary.) To see how HP's cost per page compares to other vendors, visit the Printer Comparison Center.

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D

Display resolution

The numbers of pixels (in millions) that are supported by a projector’s default display resolution. HP projectors are available in two native resolutions: SVGA (800 x 600) and XGA (1024 x 768). Since digital images are made up of millions of pixels, the greater number of pixels that can be displayed by a device provides the most detail.

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Although a projector has a default (or native) display resolution, most all projectors will display resolutions other than their default. For example, an SVGA projector can accept an XGA 1024 x 768 signal and compress it into its 800 x 600 resolution. Equally, most XGA projectors can take an 800 x 600 signal and scale it up to its default 1024 x 768 resolution.

A general rule of thumb is that no projector compresses or scales a non-default signal cleanly. The result is a soft-focus look when you project spreadsheets and text documents. When selecting a projector for purchase, resolution scaling or compression should not be a factor for selecting a projector. When planning your presentations, match the resolution of your computer to the display resolution of the projector.


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Dots per inch (dpi)

Dots per inch has been the traditional measurement and indicator of a printer's output quality and refers to how many dots of ink are placed on each inch of a piece of paper or other media by a printer. For more about output quality, see resolution.

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Double-sided printing

See Duplex Printing.

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Duplex Printing

Printing on both sides of a page. Auto-duplexing printers offer automatic double-sided printing with help from a duplexing accessory that allows the printer to automatically output a two-sided page. This feature makes it easy to print on both sides of the page without manual intervention and saves paper.

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Duty Cycle

The maximum usage level per month for a printer is the duty cycle. This rating takes into account printer specifics such as the paper-handling capacity and cartridge replacement.

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Different departments in your company may have very different duty cycle needs. Some, like legal and accounting, may print reams of documents almost daily, while others like IT may not print much at all. As you consider your duty cycle needs, pay close attention to the different departments that will share the printer and how much they print monthly. You may be able to address the light duty cycle needs of one group with the heavy duty cycle needs of another in a single printer or multifunction device, or you may choose to give each group with high usage requirements their own printer to ensure their printing needs are met. Running a printer regularly at the top end of its duty cycle causes users to replace supplies more often, which reduces their productivity and increases your supplies usage. You should choose a printer with a duty cycle that exceeds your current production needs by a substantial margin to minimize interventions and maximize the life of your printer.

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E

Embedded Media Card Readers

Slots built into an HP printer that allow it to print photos directly from a memory card. HP media card readers support most common memory card formats, including CompactFlash Type I and II, SmartMedia, Secure Digital, MultiMedia Cards, Memory Stick, XD, and USB flash drive.

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Exposure control

Digital cameras require adjustments to control the levels of brightness, color saturation, and contrast in the final image. The factors that define correct exposure in a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera are the visible light spectrum wavelength-dependent sensitivity, the intensity of illumination, and the length of time the CCD is exposed to light.

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Exposure rating

Digital cameras have an ISO rating indicating their level of sensitivity to light. ISO 100 is the "normal" setting for most cameras, although some go as low as ISO 50. The sensitivities can be increased to 200, 400, 800, or even 3200 on high-end digital SLR (single-lens reflex) cameras.

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F

Fax PC Interface

Support for faxing from a PC without a physical document to scan and fax. If you plan to fax a large number of electronic documents created on a PC, this feature allows you to avoid printing the documents before faxing -- this saves time and consumables.

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Finishing

See Paper Handling.

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First Page Out

The time it takes a printer to produce the first page of print job when warming up from powersave mode. HP Laser printers use Instant-on Technology to speed the first page out so you get your complete print job sooner.

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Focal range

The minimum and maximum range a camera can focus on an object. This includes a range from a moderate wide angle to moderate telephoto. The ability to lock focus at infinity, and to set focus manually. Maximum aperture ranges depend on the lens zoom setting.

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For example, focus ranges from 1.6 feet (0.5 meters) to infinity in normal mode, with a macro setting ranging from 6 to 39 inches (14 to 100 centimeters); as well as standard and macro focus modes.

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Focus

To bring to a single point rays of light to form an image by reflecting the light by a mirror or refracting by a lens.

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HP cameras may have four methods of focusing:

  • Normal (default)
  • Macro
  • Infinity
  • Manual

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H

Hard Disk

A hard drive for your printer that can store files, fonts, forms, and other commonly used data right on a printer, which speeds the time it takes to print a document. Some hard drives also make it possible to protect confidential documents by holding the document on the drive until a user physically enters a PIN on the printer.

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Host-Based Printing

A printing approach that utilizes the processor on the PC that is sending a print job to create the printable pages, rather than generating those pages on the printer itself. Printers that utilize host-based printing can be more cost-effective because they do not require a powerful processor of their own. Since HP's host-based printing solutions utilize the GDI interface that is built into Microsoft Windows, you can begin using host-based printing immediately without investing in additional software.

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I

ImageREt 2400

A system of innovative laser printing technologies developed by HP that helps you print high quality images, text, and graphics automatically with crisp detail and consistent color.

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ImageREt 2400 provides the best color print-quality without changes to driver settings or trading print quality for better performance or less memory. ImageREt 2400 uses multi-layer technologies to modulate dot size and position as well as multi-level technologies to precisely control color by combining up to four colors within a single dot and by varying the amount of toner in a given area. HP ImageREt 2400 utilizes these five technologies to offer high-quality printing:

  • High resolution laser imaging system
  • Robust print mechanism
  • Image enhancements
  • Closed loop color calibration
  • Smart supplies with chemically-grown spherical toner

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ImageREt 3600

A system of innovative laser printing technologies designed by HP for general office document and marketing collateral that does well in different environmental conditions and with a variety of media.

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ImageREt 3600 provides the best color print-quality without changes to driver settings or trading print quality for better performance or less memory. ImageREt 3600 uses multi-layer technologies to modulate dot size and position as well as multi-level technologies to precisely control color by combining up to four colors within a single dot and by varying the amount of toner in a given area. HP ImageREt 3600 utilizes these seven print technologies to deliver professional print quality:

  • High resolution laser imaging system
  • Accurate print mechanism
  • Superior image enhancements
  • Intelligent color control
  • Adaptive gloss finish
  • System-optimized for HP high gloss paper
  • Smart printing supplies with chemically-grown spherical toner

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ImageREt 4800

A system of innovative laser printing technologies designed by HP to deliver print quality equivalent to or better than most commercial printing presses.

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ImageREt 480000 provides the best color print-quality without changes to driver settings or trading print quality for better performance or less memory. ImageREt 4800 uses multi-layer technologies to modulate dot size and position as well as multi-level technologies to precisely control color by combining up to four colors within a single dot and by varying the amount of toner in a given area. HP ImageREt 4800 combines these seven technologies to deliver a print quality that has never been seen until now:

  • High resolution laser imaging system
  • Accurate print mechanism
  • Superior image enhancements
  • Intelligent color control
  • Adaptive gloss finish
  • System-optimized for HP high gloss paper
  • Smart printing supplies with chemically-grown spherical toner

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Imaging technology

A camera’s built-in tools for correcting two very common complaints in point and shoot photographs: red-eye removal and adaptive lighting.

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For example: adaptive lighting option (which may be available in different strength settings) simulates the effect of a fill flash by boosting brightness in shadow areas of images.

Other features may include: HP Real Life Technologies including In-Camera Panorama Preview, HP Image Advice, HP Noise Filter, HP Adaptive Demosiac, HP Vignetting, and HP Preferred Photo Reproduction.

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Inkjet

HP's thermal inkjet technology (TIJ) printers use an array of tiny nozzles to create millions of ink droplets, placing them in precise combinations onto the paper or other print media. To enhance speed, reliability, and cost savings, HP's business inkjet technology uses a modular ink delivery system that separates print heads from ink cartridges. This system allows the print heads to move more rapidly and ink cartridges to hold more ink. Smart chips in the print head monitor ink use and print head condition for consistently efficient, quality operation.

Inkjet technology offers:

  • Support for specialty papers, wide format, and unique media types
  • Photorealistic image capabilities
  • No fuser or drum replacement costs

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Ink Type

The kind of ink an inkjet printer uses to transfer a printed image to the page. HP inkjet and Photosmart printers use pigment-based inks that penetrate below the paper surface to provide rich color depth, minimal dot visibility, and uniform gloss. To learn more about ink technologies and HP's innovations in ink, review this PDF from HP Labs.

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Input Capacity

The number of sheets of standard printer paper that can be stored in a printer's paper trays. Because they do not require constant refilling, printers with high input capacities are particularly useful for printers used by a workgroup or any large group of people.

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Installed digital projectors

Designed for permanent placement in conference rooms and auditoriums with 15 or more participants and little or no ambient lighting. A permanent installation typically includes audio connections to built-in or permanently affixed high-end sound systems.
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HP digital projectors such as the xp8010 and xp8020 series ensure that your messages are conveyed with crisp, bright, easy-to-read images and text. Not to mention -- with the integration of HP color innovations, these digital projectors will do the work for you, allowing you to focus your attention where it needs to be the most: on your audience.

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Instant-on Technology

Cutting-edge fuser technology that allows HP laser printers to produce the first page faster when the printer is coming out of powersave mode, giving you your complete print job sooner. Why wait? Learn more about Instant-on Technology and the benefits it offers.

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K

Keystone correction

Also called horizontal and vertical keystone correction; the most typical adjustment is to vertical keystone correction. This means that when an image is projected upwards it creates a trapezoidal image shape; vertical keystone correction then squares the image. If an image is projected from the side, a combination of vertical and horizontal keystone correction is required to square the image. Keystone correction requires images to be rescaled, which can have a minor effect on some elements in the projected image.

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L

Laser

Laser printers apply lasers to a photoconductive drum at specific printer dot locations. Through this process, the drum is "imaged" with an electrical charge that attracts exacting combinations of toner particles to the drum for transfer to the printed page. At the end of the printing process, a high temperature roller and a pressure roller melt then fuse the plastic toner particles to the paper. Due to the heat involved in this process, there is a more limited range of media supported for LaserJet printing than inkjet printing.

Laser technology offers:

  • High-volumes and fast output of lengthy documents
  • High-yield consumables
  • Multiple high-volume paper trays and finishing options

Learn more about ink and laser technology


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Laser Quality Speed

What is it?
Laser Quality Speed (LQS) is an HP-developed specification to enable a speed comparison of the HP Officejet line of printers to laser printers, thereby assisting customer purchase considerations. The print speed experienced by customers from an Inkjet printer is highly dependent on many variables, including the coverage and content of the printed document. In contrast, laser print speed is much less dependent on document content and coverage. The Laser Quality Speed specification helps customers make a performance comparison between the print speeds of an inkjet printer and a laser printer. 


How does it work?
To measure Laser Quality Speed for an inkjet printing device, HP prints a representative suite of documents in the printer’s default quality setting (normal mode for HP Officejet or Officejet Pro Color Printers and AiOs). The suite includes several monochrome & color documents, including pages of various text coverage, and full page graphics and image files. The speed reporting methodology averages the print engine’s black and color speeds, in pages per minute, by calculating an average text print speed, and then averages that speed with the print speed of a more complex, full page document. The resulting average pages per minute (ppm) speed determine the “Laser Quality Speed” specification.

HP’s Laser Quality Speed measurement process is based on three important factors:

  • Speed measurements use comparable print qualities. For the HP Officejet line of printers and AiOs, the default plain paper normal mode is used to generate the Laser Quality Speed specification.
  • Speed measurements are done over a range of document types and content.
  • The measurement process is designed to avoid the influence of the host PC performance, and to represent the printer hardware, or print engine, performance.

This approach allows a more direct comparison with published laser printer ppm speed specifications. Laser Quality Speed is based on HP internal testing and methodology and is not an industry standard.

Where is it used?

Laser Quality Speed is used in product data sheets, customer education manuals, brochures, collaterals, and other customer communications meant to help customers make purchase choices between Officejet and laser printers.

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Lens

The dimensions of the projector lens determine the length of the projection beam required for a projector to produce an image of a desired size. A lens can also increase or decrease the size of the image projected onto a screen; indirectly making images appear to be in or out of focus.

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There are three general types of lenses: long- and short-throw; and wide-angle. A long-throw lens is used on projectors that are installed far away from the projection screen. Short-throw lenses are used on projectors that are centered and not placed too far away from the screen. A wide-angle lens can project a very large image from just a couple to a few feet away from the projection screen.


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Lens system

The caliber/quality of the lens designed for the camera’s capabilities. Unlike conventional cameras, digital camera lenses are designed to work with a specific sensor size.

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Because of the sensor size, the lenses used in digital compact cameras have to be of much higher optical quality than glass, which would be acceptable on a 35mm camera. This is less of an issue with digital SLRs because their sensors are much larger.


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Light source

The light source in a projector is derived from a bulb, also called a lamp. The intensity of the light is determined by the power it consumes: a high watt measure (300-watt) produces a brighter and hotter light. HP projectors use different size lamps ranging from 120- to 210-watt lamps. A lamp has a definitive life-span (measured in lit hours) and the brightness of the lamp diminishes over time.

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M

Maximum scan size

The physical horizontal and vertical dimension of an original document or image that can be scanned based on the size of the scanner.

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Media Size

The sizes of paper, envelopes, and other media that a printer's paper trays will support. The more media sizes your printer supports, the more flexibility you have in the types of documents you can print on that printer.

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Media Type

The various types of media a printer supports. Beyond standard office paper, which may include plain, glossy, letterhead, recycled, and other standard weight papers, a printer may also support envelopes, transparencies, cardstock, labels, and more. It's better to choose a printer with a wider variety of media options than to try to force the printer to print on media it doesn't support.

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Media Weight

The paper weights that a printer supports. Paper weight is determined by the total weight of 500 pieces of paper. Standard laser or inkjet paper typically weights 24lb, while photo papers may weigh 32lb and higher. The higher the paper weight your printer supports, the more media options it will have.

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Memory

RAM built into a print that increases print speed and helps process large and complex documents. Maximum memory is the total amount of memory a printer can accommodate.

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Memory is an important consideration on most color printers and for any printer you plan to share on a network among multiple employees. For example, a color LaserJet printer may utilize its memory to speed the printing of complicated graphics or photographs, making it easier and more efficient to print color documents in-house regularly. Similarly, a shared office inkjet printer might utilize memory to process several print jobs sent to it from different employees at one time. This reduces the time it takes to transfer the print job from the employee computers to the printer and helps employees get back to work more quickly. A printer's maximum memory is the total amount of memory it can accommodate, and is typically more than the standard memory that comes installed on the printer. As you evaluate a printer, consider how much memory you can add later as your printing needs change.

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Memory/storage

Some digital cameras have internal memory, while others rely on memory cards to save the captured images. The size of the memory determines the number of images that can be saved at one time.

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For example: HP Photosmart R707 stores its images in 32MB of internal memory (of which 27MB is available for storage), or alternatively on optional Secure Digital (SD) memory cards.


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Mobile projectors

Designed for road warriors who frequently create and deliver external presentations.

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These products are built to fit into a computer bag or briefcase. Design focus is on ruggedness, reliability, minimal weight, small size, and flexibility for digital projection in any room with 2 to 50 participants and flexible lighting conditions. Wireless and PC-less projection provides the ultimate flexibility by removing cable-length limitations and the need for a PC for a presentation.


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Multitasking Capability

The ability of a Multifunction product (MFP) or All-in-One (AIO) to perform multiple functions at one time. When you choose an MFP or AIO with this functionality, you can utilize more than one feature of your device at one time, which improves productivity and device utilization.

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N

Networked/Network-ready

An inkjet or laser printer or MFP that you can connect to a network and administer from a Web browser via its built-in Web server. You can manage all of your networked printers at once with HP's free Web Jetadmin software.

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Many of HP's inkjet and LaserJet printers and MFPs (multifunction products) are equipped with HP Jetdirect internal print servers that allow you to connect the printer directly to your company's Local Area Network (LAN) with a standard Ethernet cable. Once you attach the printer to your network, all of the users on your network can share it. It may be less expensive to purchase a single workgroup printer to share over the network instead of several personal printers that won't be shared. Workgroup printers can typically provide your employees with more features than personal printers and you can use Web Jetadmin -- HP's free print network management tool -- to conveniently and easily manage all of your networked printers from a single location. Learn more about HP's tools for networking and managing printers

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O

Output Capacity

The number of sheets of standard printer paper that can be stored in a printer's output trays. The higher a printer's output capacity, the better it can support large printing projects.

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P

Paper Handling

Support for professional paper handling functionality such as duplexing, folding, saddle stitching, corner stapling, and stacking. If you are producing marketing or other professional documents on your in-house printer, finishing capabilities add the final touch.

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PhotoREt

A photo resolution enhancement technology developed by HP to achieve the highest quality photo printing results on photo and plain paper with 289 levels of shade for each color and a complete palette in excess of 1.2 million colors.

Learn More
Printers equipped with HP PhotoREt technology uses color layering technology to produce photo-quality color images. With advancements in its multidrop color layering process, HP PhotoREt controls the placement of those six inks more precisely than before. Each dot is capable of receiving up to 32 minuscule drops of color, each one precisely positioned to achieve smoother gradations in tone and to virtually eliminate any grain in the printed image. Full dye-load inks in cyan, magenta, and yellow, produce vibrant color. Light dye-load inks of light cyan and light magenta, as well as a specially formulated dye-based black ink, dramatically increase the range of available colors, while the black is richer, deeper, and glossier than the usual black that is produced by a composite of colored inks. This means you'll get finer details and a wider range of colors. The newest generation of HP color layering technology?HP PhotoREt IV uses six-ink color printing to produce up to 289 levels of color for than 1.2 million colors. Learn more about PhotoREt III technology

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Power consumption

The maximum energy a projector will use, measured in watts.

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Many projectors have a standard mode and an economy or low-wattage mode, with the standard mode requiring more energy to run but also producing brighter image.

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Printing Technologies

The technology a printer employs to transfer images and text to media. HP inkjet printers use drops of ink to form images (characters or graphics) on plain paper in a matrix format. HP LaserJet printers use toner that fuses on to paper.

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Inkjet and laser technologies in HP printers are both designed for outstanding, efficient, reliable results for a variety of needs.


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Print Drivers

The standard drivers available to allow the printer to interface with different operating systems and applications. HP regularly makes printer drivers available for systems beyond Windows, including Mac and Linux, so your printer will work seamlessly with all of the computers in your office.

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Print Server

Allows you to connect a printer directly to your office network rather than connecting it to a PC. HP internal Jetdirect print servers fit neatly into your printer or multifunction product and give you maximum printer performance. If an internal print server isn't available for your HP printer, or you want to connect non-HP printers to your network with the same ease as your HP printers, choose an external Jetdirect print server. HP internal and external print servers are also available to connect to Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Bluetooth, or wireless 802.11b networks.

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Networked printers print at network speeds and give you the flexibility to place printers anywhere you'd like in your office. And you can either use the built-in Web server to view and manage your printer from any Internet-connected computer or use HP's Web Jetadmin software to manage multiple printers. Learn more about the benefits of connecting your printers to the network.


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Print Speed

Measured in pages per minute (ppm), print speed is the rate at which a printer outputs either black and white or colored text.

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Print speed specifications define what the printer is capable off, but several factors affect the time it takes for each page in your document to print:

  • The complexity of the page you are printing. Images take longer to print than text, and image-intensive pages can take longer to print than those with a single page.
  • The connection between your printer and the computer sending the files to be printed. A slow network connection can impede the transmission of files from a computer to the printer.
  • The amount of memory installed on the printer. The more memory available to the printer, the faster its output.
Published print speeds for inkjet printers assume the printer is printing in draft mode. Increasing the print quality on an inkjet printer reduces the print speed. However, HP laser printers only have one print quality -- best -- so the published print speed applies to all text you print on the printer. Print speed is a key consideration if you are purchasing a printer that will be used regularly by several employees. If your staff is waiting for the print outs they need to do their jobs, they will be less productive than if they can immediately pick up the documents they send to the printer.

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Projection distance

The maximum distance a projector can be from a screen and still cast a usable image in a dark room.

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If you are purchasing a projector to install permanently or semi-permanently in a room, be sure to measure the distance from your planned projector location to your planned screen location so you can choose a projector with the required projection distance capabilities.

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Projection screen size

The range of screen sizes that a projector can accommodate.

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If you are purchasing a projector that needs to fill a particular size screen with a image, be sure to measure the screen before purchase to insure that your projector can produce an image of the required size.


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R

Recommended Monthly Volume

The number of output pages a printer is designed to support on a monthly basis. While exceeding the recommended volume occasionally poses no problem, regularly exceeding it can reduce the life of your printer and compromise print quality. It's better to choose a printer whose recommended monthly volume exceeds your current needs so you have room to grow as your printing needs grow.

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Resolution

Resolution is a measurement of a printer's quality and is traditionally measured in dots per inch (DPI). Generally, the higher the DPI, the better the detail and clarity your printed image will have. However, HP's new image enhancement technologies -- ImageREt and PhotoREt -- go beyond simple DPI to improve image quality to make an image with lower DPI look even better than an image with higher physical DPI.

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HP color technologies use layers of color to deliver higher quality printing without the disadvantages of higher DPI. They control the size, color, and shade of ink dots, with a higher percentage of dots at the outline of an image, and blend the dots within the image for better overall image quality. On inkjet printers, media also has a significant affect on the final quality and resolution of an image. To obtain the highest photo quality DPI, you should use a combination of HP PhotoREt ink technology and premium photo papers or high-resolution inkjet papers.


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Resolution: Digital Photography

Digital images are made up of millions of dots called pixels, and the greater amount of pixels the camera has, the more detail the camera can capture.

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For example: a camera that captures 1600 x 1200 pixels produces an image with a resolution of 1.92 million pixels and would be referred to as a 2.0 megapixel camera. You get to 1.92 million pixels by multiplying the vertical and horizontal dimensions.


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S

Scan input

The different destinations or applications a scanner supports for scanned documents. In addition to scanning a document or picture directly to a file system, many HP scanners offer featuers that allow you to scan directly to e-mail or make a copy of the scanned image. In addition, several scanners may support TWAIN scanning so you can scan images directly into TWAIN-compliant applications like Adobe Photoshop.

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Scan resolution

Resolution determines the size of the image to be processed. Low resolutions are used for Web content. High resolution (300x300) should be selected for professional printing.

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Scanner type

Scanners are available in different sizes for different purposes: flatbed, hand held, photograph (no slides or negatives), transparency scanner (slides and negatives only), and photo scanner (photographs, slides and negatives).

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Shutter speed

Shutter speed determines the length of time the camera's sensor is exposed to light. In other words, a digital camera’s shutter switches on the light-sensitive photodiodes of the sensor for the length of time determined by the shutter speed.

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To get more light into the camera you decrease the shutter speed, or keep the shutter open for a longer period of time.


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Sound capture

The ability to record a snippet of sound to accompany a picture captured on a digital camera. The sound snippet is stored with the image so you can refer back to it later.

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If you are using your camera to capture product images or other shots for marketing materials, you can make an audio note to yourself of when and where you took the picture, as well as any ideas you have for using it in your business.


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T

Task speed

The speed at which an original can be scanned and placed within a software application.

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For example, less than 15 sec: 4 x 6-in color photo into Microsoft Word; less than 33 sec: OCR a full page of text into Microsoft Word; less than 18 sec: e-mail photo.

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Type Faces

Built-in support for a collection of standard typefaces that make it easy to create the look you want. Select HP printers support a variety of typefaces, including Microsoft Windows fonts, scalable TrueType? fonts, and PostScript language fonts.

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V

Versatile projectors

Designed for placement in boardrooms and classrooms with 2 to 50 participants and flexible lighting conditions. Weighing approximately 4 lbs, these projectors are mobile enough to be shared by different workgroups.

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Onsite projectors offer the best combination of performance, features, and price.

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W

Wi-Fi

The family of 802.11x wireless LAN protocols that allow computers to communicate with one another without wires. HP offers both internal and external Jetdirect print servers to extend Wi-Fi capabilities to your printers so they can participate on a wireless network like your PCs and notebooks. Select printers also include embedded support for Wi-Fi. A wireless printing infrastructure is easy to adapt and easy to grow as your companies needs expand. Learn more about wireless Jetdirect.

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Z

Zoom capability: Digital Photography

Also called a digital camera’s focal length. Generally, this is the distance measured in millimeters and includes a “normal” view of how the naked eye sees things, and a “wide-angle” view determined by the ability of the lens to zoom out or in: zoom does not always mean “close-up.”

Digital cameras may have an optical zoom, a digital zoom, or both. See optical zoom and digital zoom.

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Zoom capability: Projectors

Optical/manual or digital zoom is a feature on standard, long, and short throw lenses. The zoom feature allows images to be increased or decreased on the screen.

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